Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2018        Go!    
 
 
September 22, Saturday 2018 4:30 PM       

       HEADLINES: Abhilash Tomy injured as storm hits Golden Globe Race                                              Bishop discharged from hospital                                              Saradakkutty remembers nuns who stood with victim                                              Keralites salute sister Anupama                                              Bishop to be presented in court after another medical check-up                                              We did not have a choice, says ex-French President Hollande on Reliance getting Rafale offsets                                              “If church try to throw us out, we’ll face it”, say nuns                                              Russia warns US it is 'playing with fire' with sanctions                                              Batsmen have to be better prepared when they go to England next time: Dravid                                              Batsmen have to be better prepared when they go to England next time: Dravid                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: A new weapon against epilepsy  
       Daily intake of this drug can cause certain cancers in men
 
        Aspirin,
         Posted on :18:13:47 May 4, 2018
   
A A
       Last edited on:18:13:47 May 4, 2018
         Tags: Daily intake of this drug can cause certain c
 

WASHINGTON DC: Daily consumption of a regular over-the-counter drug can cause certain cancers among men, a new research claims.

According to the study conducted by the Northwestern University, men who take once-daily aspirin have nearly double the risk of melanoma compared to men who are not exposed to daily aspirin.

Women, however, do not have an increased risk in this large patient population.

"Given the widespread use of aspirin and the potential clinical impact of the link to melanoma, patients, and healthcare providers need to be aware of the possibility of increased risk for men," said senior study author Beatrice Nardone.

She suggested increasing patient education about sun exposure, avoiding tanning beds and getting skin checks by a dermatologist, particularly for individuals who are already at high risk for skin cancers.

"This does not mean men should stop aspirin therapy to lower the risk of heart attack," she stressed.

Almost half of people age 65 and over reported taking aspirin daily or every other day, according to a 2005 study. In 2015, about half of a nationwide survey of US adults reported regular aspirin use.

Nardone was surprised at the results because aspirin is reported to reduce the risk of gastric, colon, prostate and breast cancer. And some previous studies have reported a reduced risk in aspirin-exposed men and an increased risk in aspirin-exposed women.

Nardone attributed this to the variability of the research methods used in studies that look for associations and risks for cancers.

Among the numerous possibilities, one reason men may be more vulnerable could be related to males (human and animal species) expressing a lower amount of protective enzymes, like superoxide dismutase and catalase, compared to females, Nardone speculated.

"These lower levels of protective enzymes suggest that a higher level of resulting oxidative cellular damage in men might contribute to the possibility of developing melanoma," said Nardone.

The study collected medical record data comprising almost 200,000 patients who were aspirin-exposed or aspirin-unexposed (control group), ages 18-89, with no prior history of melanoma and with a follow-up time of at least five years.

For the aspirin-exposed patient population, the study included only patients who had at least one year of once-daily aspirin exposure at a dose of 81 or 325 mg occurring between January 2005 and December 2006 in order to allow for at least five years of follow-up data to detect if melanoma occurred over time.

Out of a total of 195,140 patients, 1,187 were aspirin exposed. Of these 1,187 patients, 26 (2.19 per cent) (both men and women) had a subsequent diagnosis for melanoma compared to 1,676 (0.86 per cent) in aspirin-unexposed (men and women) patients.

When the groups were separated into men and women, men exposed to aspirin had almost twice the risk for diagnosis of melanoma (adjusted relative risk: 1.83) compared to men in the same population who were not exposed to aspirin.

The study appears in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: A new weapon against epilepsy
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Pluto should be reclassified as a planet, reveals study  
Shared responsibility essential for conserving migratory species  
Microsoft releases Speech Corpus for three Indian languages  
Facebook likely to run on 100% renewable energy by 2020  
Can brain suppress the act of revenge?  
Kerala techies launch portal to facilitate relief measures  
Here's what you may not know about H2O  
Alexa will tell you when it has done its homework  
Students recreate horrific atomic bombings of Hiroshima using VR technology  
Study discovers compounds that can reverse cell ageing  
Online interactive courses on AI in trading, first time on internet  
Apple to fix devices damaged by Japan's floods for free  
IT industry should focus on developing new technologies  
Skype adds read receipts to chats  
Mobile app for replacement of transformers in Raj  
Kashmiri students make solar boat for Dal Lake  
NASA prepares to fly probe into Sun's scorching atmosphere  
Yoga helps against non-communicable diseases: WHO  
Spironolactone can help prevent acne: Study  
Older Amazonian forests help regulate global climate  
Goal conflict linked to depressive symptoms  
A new world: Top 10 new species for 2018  
Beat the risk of frailty with healthy heart  
Twitter to hide trolls that hurl abuse: Twitter CEO  
Fortnite is finally coming to Android  
 
Do you think the police are delaying the arrest of Bishop Franco due to Vatican Pope's interference?
yes
 
no
 
don't know
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy