Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
October 09, Friday 2015 11:07 PM       

       HEADLINES: Tipper driver dies in accident                                              Evidence against Vellapally handed over to VS: Biju Ramesh                                              Sudheeran, M A Shukoor challenges SNDP                                              Beef fest: No action against Deepa                                              No setbacks in bar bribery case: Vinson M Paul                                              Hand chopping incident: It's unacceptable, says Swaraj                                              Kejriwal sacks food minister for corruption                                              Azamgarh youth with ISIS in Iraq wants to return home                                              One shot dead, three wounded in US university 'confrontation'                                              Karun hits ton as Karnataka take 1st innings vs Bengal                                              Pune edge past NorthEast by a solitary goal                                              Sania-Martina enter China Open final                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Microsoft unveils Windows 8 for public test  
       'Humans evolved from a two-inch worm'
         Posted on :00:12:00 Mar 7, 2012
       Last edited on:00:12:00 Mar 7, 2012
         Tags: Humans, two-inch worm

HUMANS have evolved from this two-inch worm, scientists claim. The extinct Pikaia gracilens lived in the sea more than 500million years ago. Now scientists have linked it to humans, saying that it is a primitive ancestor of animals with spinal cords.

It also gave rise to fish, birds, reptiles and other mammals.

Although Pikaia was first discovered in 1911, scientists assumed it was only related to leeches and earthworms.

But the spinal cord, paired with zig-zag patterened blocks of muscle tissue known as myomeres, relates it to humans.

Lead author Professor Simon Conway Morris, from Cambridge University, said: "The discovery of myomeres is the smoking gun that we have long been seeking.

"This study clearly places Pikaia as the planet's most primitive chordate.

"So, next time we put the family photograph on the mantle-piece, there in the background will be Pikaia."

Using cutting-edge microscopes and imagery techniques, scientists revealed fine details in the Pikaia fossils.

Every specimen of Pikaia discovered so far has come from the Burgess Shale fossil beds in Canada's Yoho National Park.
It is thought to have swum above the sea floor by bending its body from side to side.

Dr Jean-Bernard Caron, from the University of Toronto in Canada, took part in the research.

He said: "It's very humbling to know that swans, snakes, bears, zebras and, incredibly, humans all share a deep history with this tiny creature no longer than my thumb."

Next Article: Microsoft unveils Windows 8 for public test
Nobel discoveries on DNA repair now fuelling cancer drug research  
Search for Mars life stymied by contamination threat  
Scientists gain new insight into how brain perceives the world  
Completely paralysed man walks again using brainwaves  
Apple's iOS App Store suffers first major attack  
Indian-American scientist uses sound waves to control brain cells  
Earth's gravitational pull shrinking the Moon: NASA  
Facebook to introduce 'dislike' button  
ASTROSAT set for Sep 28 launch  
Apple computer hand-built by Steve Jobs to fetch 330k pounds  
'Smart' bandage to speed up wound healing  
Depth-sensing camera now captures 3D information in sunlight  
Google introduces new logo  
New cheaper, more efficient LED technology developed  
Indian American student discovers Jupiter-like planet  
Facebook, Google, Twitter join hands against child porn  
Now, buy products through Twitter  
NASA satellite captures 'dark side' of Moon  
Over 800 'ultra dark' galaxies found  
NASA reveals colour images of Pluto and Charon  
Twitter introduces autoplay video  
Delivery by drone in 30 minutes? Amazon says it's coming  
World's first water-based computer developed  
Sun 'eclipses' Indian Mars Orbiter for 15 days  
US doctors perform world's first skull-scalp transplant  
Is beef festival relevant in Kerala where beef is not banned?
Don't Know
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy