Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
November 24, Friday 2017 11:06 AM       

       HEADLINES: Swift not She is wealth: Family takes back bride                                              Chennithala welcomes economic status-based reservation in Devaswom board                                              Vyapam scam: 30 Interim bail applications rejected                                              Zimbabwe's ex-VP Mnangagwa to be sworn in as President                                              Russia, Iran, Turkey agree to hold Syrian 'congress'                                              SE Asia, S Asia beginning to emerge as regional powers: Australia FM                                              Tibet wants to stay with China, seeks development: Dalai Lama                                              Here's when Federer felt insulted                                              BCCI has lost its reputation: Anurag Thakur                                              Hong Kong Open: Sindhu advances to quarter finals                                              Virat Kohli slams poor planning by BCCI ahead of SA tour                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Curiosity rover discovers rare 'Egg Rock' on Mars  
       NASA satellites break Guinness World Record
 
         Posted on :16:51:44 Nov 5, 2016
   
A A
       Last edited on:16:51:44 Nov 5, 2016
         Tags: NASA satellites, Guinness World Record
 
WASHINGTON: NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) has set the Guinness World Record for highest altitude fix of a GPS signal - at 70,000 kilometres above the surface of the Earth.
 
Operating in a highly elliptical orbit around Earth, the four MMS spacecraft incorporate Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements into their precise tracking systems, which require extremely sensitive position and orbit calculations to guide tight flying formations.
 
Earlier this year, MMS achieved the closest flying separation of a multi-spacecraft formation with only 7.2 km between the four satellites. When the satellites are closest to Earth, they move at up to 35,405 km per hour, making them the fastest known operational use of a GPS receiver.
 
When MMS is not breaking records, it conducts ground-breaking science. Still in the first year of its prime mission, MMS is giving scientists new insight into Earth's magnetosphere.
 
The mission uses four individual satellites that fly in a pyramid formation to map magnetic reconnection – a process that occurs as the sun and Earth's magnetic fields interact.
 
Precise GPS tracking allows the satellites to maintain a tight formation and obtain high resolution three-dimensional observations.
 
Understanding the causes of magnetic reconnection is important for understanding phenomena around the universe from auroras on Earth, to flares on the surface of the sun, and even to areas surrounding black holes.
 
Next year, MMS will enter Phase 2 of the mission and the satellites will be sent in to an even larger orbit where they will explore a different part of Earth's magnetosphere.
 
During that time, the satellites are anticipated to break their current high altitude GPS record by a factor of two or more.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Curiosity rover discovers rare 'Egg Rock' on Mars
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
How breastmilk protects babies from food allergy decoded  
Stars among the oldest in our galaxy discovered  
Apple delays release of smart speaker - HomePod  
Owning a dog may add years to your life  
'Textisms' actually add meaning to written words  
Sugar may heal wounds, says study  
Heart-stopping sex? It's rare  
Over 1.3 lakh Indians 'book ticket' to Mars  
China all set to make first contact with aliens  
Greenland Ice sheet could be losing mass, says study  
'Flying taxis' could be a thing by 2020  
When art comes to the rescue of depressed patients  
Here's a mechanism that can help you get rid of bad memories  
2017 ozone hole smallest since 1988: NASA  
Marijuana can dull the brain in some HIV patients  
We use lesser brainpower than thought  
You can soon delete 'sent messages' on WhatsApp  
There is a connection between nose and emotions  
75% of pet reptiles die within a year: Study  
Gamma rays will reach beyond limits of light: Researchers  
Suicide molecules may help combat cancer: Study  
Aspirin a day may keep liver cancer away  
Clearing the myths about osteoporosis  
Stress as unhealthy as junk food  
Planet Nine does exist in solar system: NASA  
 
Do you think that all charges against actor Dileep under various IPC sections will stand in the court?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy