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       SCI&TECH Next Article: Curiosity rover discovers rare 'Egg Rock' on Mars  
       NASA satellites break Guinness World Record
 
         Posted on :16:51:44 Nov 5, 2016
   
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       Last edited on:16:51:44 Nov 5, 2016
         Tags: NASA satellites, Guinness World Record
 
WASHINGTON: NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) has set the Guinness World Record for highest altitude fix of a GPS signal - at 70,000 kilometres above the surface of the Earth.
 
Operating in a highly elliptical orbit around Earth, the four MMS spacecraft incorporate Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements into their precise tracking systems, which require extremely sensitive position and orbit calculations to guide tight flying formations.
 
Earlier this year, MMS achieved the closest flying separation of a multi-spacecraft formation with only 7.2 km between the four satellites. When the satellites are closest to Earth, they move at up to 35,405 km per hour, making them the fastest known operational use of a GPS receiver.
 
When MMS is not breaking records, it conducts ground-breaking science. Still in the first year of its prime mission, MMS is giving scientists new insight into Earth's magnetosphere.
 
The mission uses four individual satellites that fly in a pyramid formation to map magnetic reconnection – a process that occurs as the sun and Earth's magnetic fields interact.
 
Precise GPS tracking allows the satellites to maintain a tight formation and obtain high resolution three-dimensional observations.
 
Understanding the causes of magnetic reconnection is important for understanding phenomena around the universe from auroras on Earth, to flares on the surface of the sun, and even to areas surrounding black holes.
 
Next year, MMS will enter Phase 2 of the mission and the satellites will be sent in to an even larger orbit where they will explore a different part of Earth's magnetosphere.
 
During that time, the satellites are anticipated to break their current high altitude GPS record by a factor of two or more.
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       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Curiosity rover discovers rare 'Egg Rock' on Mars
 
 
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