Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
June 22, Thursday 2017 5:29 PM       

       HEADLINES: Village assistant suspended over farmer’s suicide                                              Puthuvype protest: DGP Jacob Thomas condemns police action                                              Farmer’s suicide is stain on govt’s image: Minister M M Mani                                              Chennithala apologises for inconvenience due to ‘Janakeeya Yatra’ in Metro                                              Gangeshananda case: Court warns girl of wasting its time                                              Isha Foundation observes yoga day                                              Countdown for launch of Cartosat-2 begins                                              Karnan sent back to correctional home                                              Mosul mosque destruction means ISIS admitting defeat: Iraq PM                                              24 killed in bomb attack at New Kabul Bank in Afghanistan                                              BCCI to invite more applications for coach's post                                              Just saying, stuck to a coach I hated, for 20 years Bindra                                              Srikanth, Saina, Praneeth advance in Australian Open                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Chandrayaan-2 mission: ISRO conducts tests for Moon landing  
       Molecules on phone can unveil your lifestyle: study
 
         Posted on :17:06:08 Nov 15, 2016
   
A A
       Last edited on:17:06:08 Nov 15, 2016
         Tags: Molecules, phone, your lifestyle
 
LOS ANGELES: The molecules that you leave on your smartphone can be used to construct your personalised lifestyle 'read-out' - including diet, preferred hygiene products, health status and locations visited, a new study suggests.
 
By sampling the molecules on cell phones, researchers at University of California San Diego in the US were able to construct lifestyle sketches for each phone's owner.
 
The study could have a number of applications, including criminal profiling, airport screening, medication adherence monitoring, clinical trial participant stratification and environmental exposure studies, researchers said.
 
"You can imagine a scenario where a crime scene investigator comes across a personal object - like a phone, pen or key - without fingerprints or DNA, or with prints or DNA not found in the database," said Pieter Dorrestein, professor in UC San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
 
"So we thought what if we take advantage of left-behind skin chemistry to tell us what kind of lifestyle this person has?" Dorrestein said.
 
"We realised we could probably come up with a profile of a person's lifestyle based on chemistries we can detect on objects they frequently use," he said.
 
Thirty-nine healthy adult volunteers participated in study. The team swabbed four spots on each person's cell phone - an object we tend to spend a lot of time touching - and eight spots on each person's right hand, for a total of nearly 500 samples.
 
Then they used a technique called mass spectrometry to detect molecules from the samples. They identified as many molecules as possible by comparing them to reference structures in the GNPS database, a crowd-sourced mass spectrometry knowledge repository and annotation website developed by Dorrestein and colleagues.
 
With this information, the researchers developed a personalised lifestyle "read-out" from each phone. Some of the medications they detected on phones included anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal skin creams, hair loss treatments, anti-depressants and eye drops.
 
Food molecules included citrus, caffeine, herbs and spices. Sunscreen ingredients and DEET mosquito repellant were detected on phones even months after they had last been used by the phone owners, suggesting these objects can provide long-term composite lifestyle sketches.
 
"By analysing the molecules they've left behind on their phones, we could tell if a person is likely female, uses high-end cosmetics, dyes her hair, drinks coffee, prefers beer over wine, likes spicy food, is being treated for depression, wears sunscreen and bug spray—and therefore likely spends a lot of time outdoors—all kinds of things," said Amina Bouslimani, assistant project scientist in Dorrestein's lab.
 
To develop more precise profiles and for this method to be more useful, Dorrestein said more molecules are needed in the reference database, particularly for the most common foods people eat, clothing materials, carpets, wall paints and anything else people come into contact with.
 
The study was published in the journal PNAS.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Chandrayaan-2 mission: ISRO conducts tests for Moon landing
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Theweightmonitor.com launches mobile app for easier access to one-stop weight management platform  
New drug to treat blood cancer developed  
Threat of asteroid impact looming over Earth: experts  
Hottest known planet in universe discovered  
Wireless, battery-less pacemaker developed  
'Manned missions to Moon, Mars may face medical emergencies'  
Ransomware threat: Centre activates mechanism to prevent ‘Wannacry’ cyber attack  
2 lakh hit by 'unprecedented' cyberhack in 150 nations:Europol  
foodpanda revamps mobile app; provides more options  
ixigo launches trains app for Apple iOS users  
Virtual humans may help doctors learn empathy: study  
Gamers, here are five games to watch out for  
Yahoo India homepage gets brand new look  
Spacecraft flies between Saturn and rings in historic 1st  
Google targets 'fake news,' offensive search suggestions  
Offensive WhatsApp posts can land group admin in jail  
Facebook for 'everyone' and not just high end: Zuckerberg  
Google Earth re-invented for new era  
NASA images show how India looks from space at night  
Signs of life detected below world's deepest point  
'iPhones assembly in Bengaluru by Apple in less than a month'  
Five astronauts assigned to future ISS mission: NASA  
Trump plans to send humans to Mars  
First patient cured of rare blood disorder'  
Indian-American teen wins top science award worth USD 250,000  
 
Do you think Kerala's Gaza street has terror link?
yes
 
no
 
don't know
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy